From a national listening tour on Indian boarding schools to Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta, here are source to explain how this impacts Indian Country.
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
Example logo

Reckoning with a painful past and a concerning future,

From Secretary of Interior Deb Haaland launching a listening tour on Indian boarding schools to the Supreme Court ruling in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta, a lot is happening in Indian Country. 
 
Here are some sources who can break down how these issues impact Indian Country and Indigenous people in the United States.

The atrocities of Indian boarding schools

6d3958b8-da84-11eb-96e5-06b4694bee2a%2F1657562855622-Denise+Lajimodiere.jpeg
Courtesy of Angela Erdrich
Pronouns: she/her
Email: 
dlaj[email protected]
Phone:
(701) 793-8375
Twitter: 
@dlajimodiere
Denise Lajimodiere is a founder of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, a nonprofit focused on supporting boarding school survivors. She is an enrolled citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa (Ojibwe). 

Lajimodiere's book Stringing Rosaries: the History, the Unforgivable, and the Healing of North American Indian Boarding School Survivors (2019) features interviews from boarding school survivors. The book includes her experiences being raised by her parents, both boarding school survivors. 

Other sources of interest this week.

The Supreme Court ruled that states can prosecute non-Native Americans who commit crimes against Native Americans on tribal land in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta. With this, comes concerns for the future of tribal sovereignty and jurisdictional autonomy in Indian Country. 
 
Matthew L.M. Fletcher is a professor of law at the University of Michigan where he teaches federal Indian law, tribal law, Anishinaabe legal and political philosophy, constitutional law, federal courts, and ethics. He is the primary editor and author of Turtle Talk, a law blog on American Indian law and policy.

Fletcher is a citizen of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.
Sources of the Week on the news

Read:Watch
  • Kavita Patel talked to MSNBC about monkeypox outbreaks in several American cities and how to be safe from the virus.
Listen:
Thanks to all who have been utilizing sources.npr.org!

Have any tips, suggestions or future source ideas?
Don’t forget to follow our Twitter
 
👋 Enjoy your week!
Emma Hall | she/her | Diverse Sources Intern
You received this email because you subscribed to our list. You can unsubscribe at any time.

1111 North Capitol St NE
Washington
DC
20002
United States of America
Powered by EmailOctopus